On February 18 the Hoover High School Real World Design Challenge team met at the Science Center of Iowa to compete against other teams from around the State of Iowa in the Real World Design Challenge. This year’s challenge was to build a light sport aircraft using computer programs and techniques that are used by the aerospace industry. Part of the challenge was to design an airplane that would be economical and that must leave the smallest carbon footprint possible. The team started the project in October, and with the help from mentors from Iowa State University, the students used computer programs utilized by companies in the aerospace industry to complete the task. Amra Softic, Thayne Henderson, and Chris Markle worked on the main wing design that would be attached to a fuselage and also worked on the design of the aircraft’s tail. The airplane was then put through simulations to test if it would actually fly and meet the requirements of the Real World Design Challenge.
 
Hoover’s team was awarded Iowa’s runner up prize by Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds. Due to the student’s hard work and dedication, the team was invited to join the state winners from Davenport in the national competition in Washington, DC on April 20.  The team will be around people from all fields of the aerospace industry and will get the opportunity to meet the people that truly change the world’s transportation systems.  There will be dignitaries and CEO’s from some of the leading aerospace colleges and companies at the competition.

On February 18 the Hoover High School Real World Design Challenge team met at the Science Center of Iowa to compete against other teams from around the State of Iowa in the Real World Design Challenge. This year’s challenge was to build a light sport aircraft using computer programs and techniques that are used by the aerospace industry. Part of the challenge was to design an airplane that would be economical and that must leave the smallest carbon footprint possible. The team started the project in October, and with the help from mentors from Iowa State University, the students used computer programs utilized by companies in the aerospace industry to complete the task. Amra Softic, Thayne Henderson, and Chris Markle worked on the main wing design that would be attached to a fuselage and also worked on the design of the aircraft’s tail. The airplane was then put through simulations to test if it would actually fly and meet the requirements of the Real World Design Challenge.

 

Hoover’s team was awarded Iowa’s runner up prize by Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds. Due to the student’s hard work and dedication, the team was invited to join the state winners from Davenport in the national competition in Washington, DC on April 20.  The team will be around people from all fields of the aerospace industry and will get the opportunity to meet the people that truly change the world’s transportation systems.  There will be dignitaries and CEO’s from some of the leading aerospace colleges and companies at the competition.